Tamale Safari

Eating our way through every darn tamale in Southern California (and the world?)

Tag: mexican

Update: Tamales Albertos September 2013

It’d been quite awhile since I had a good tamale. The summer heat wave hasn’t exactly been Tamale weather. But the fall winds got me craving tamales so I headed down to the always reliable Tamales Albertos. Whoa! New paint job inside and out.

Tamales Albertos - New paint. Same location

Tamales Albertos – New paint. Same location

The price of their tamales also went up to $1.50 a piece from $1.30. (That paint must’ve been expensive.)

Mole and green chile Chicken tamales

Mole and green chile Chicken tamales

The flavor is still good and the green chile chicken pack a nice, spicy punch. I did notice that the amount of filling is less than it was when we first reviewed “Albertos.” This left the masa to filling balance a bit off for me.

Other changes are longer hours (open until 8pm) and someone actually speaks English.

Still a good deal.

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California Dreamin’; California Tamales House

Let’s face it… I rarely go to the Valley or Valley adjacent. As far as I’m concerned those are the wilds of Los Angeles, but a good Tamale Safari is filled with adventure so off we went to The California Tamales House in North Hills. (And by hills they mean strip malls;) Continue reading

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Tamara’s Tamales; Posh Spice

Let’s face it, when hunting for the best tamales in Southern California, the tendency is to look to towards the Eastside of town. However Tamara’s Tamales proves you “Westsiders” still have hope. But don’t let their gorgeous plates from the 99 cent store fool you. These beauties come at premium (a.k.a. westside) prices. Vaya con Dios. Continue reading

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Tamales Alberto; take the money and run

We have been on a tamale drought for the last month or so but the moment I spotted Tamales Alberto, I knew the drought was over.

Rants, Raves and Reviews…

Rosemary

Upon arrival to Tamales Alberto, we immediately tried to pin down our location. Were we in Echo Park? Silverlake? Downtown? A couple dining inside gave away the answer. Decked out in Dodger shirts and accessories, these folks from Fresno were on their weekly pilgrimage to find the best Mexican food before heading over to Chavez Ravine to check in on the ball game. And in the shadow of the stadium, this place was a true home run.

On a quiet Sunday morning, parking was plentiful and free. Tamales Alberto has a colorful storefront on a dull section of Temple. The small restaurant serves 4 types of Tamales: Cheese and jalapeƱo, chicken & green sauce, pork in red sauce & chicken mole. We ordered one of each and I tried to get a little insurance by asking for some hot sauce.

Our Dodger friends assured us that the hot sauce was not necessary. And they were right! Spicy, rich flavorful and delicious tamales. Served warm & freshly steamed. And did I say cheap? So far, I would have to rate Alberto at the top of the tamale list!

Masa: rich, flavorful and delicious. They got it right.

Filling: spicy chunks of chicken & pork. Copious amounts of cheese. Hmmm.

Presentation: ok, not fancy but functional, plastic plates & utensils. A rickety screen door.

Location: stars – great pit stop on the way to a ball game, otherwise a little off the beaten track. But well worth it!

Magda

There is something about a tiny dive on a stretch of Temple in East Hollywood adjacent that reeks of tamale goodness. You would never think about stopping around here. (Unless you are a hipster Vegan and know of the place across the street which really seems out of place. I digress)

The first thing to know is that this place seems to be more of a takeout joint but there are 3 or 4 tables available in this completely unadorned space. But don’t let this prevent you from making the trip because These tamales are some of the best I’ve tasted. First of all these beauties are not the usual made-the-day-before-and-warmed-in-a-microwave variety. The make them fresh daily (or is it hourly) and you get yours straight out of the steamer.

The service is Spanish only so our Spanglish resulted in each of us getting 4 different tamales rather than our usual 4 to share. No worries. Each tamale was $1.30. Yeah, we were living large.

The Green Chile Chicken are the spiciest green chile tamales that I have ever eaten. So good and moist. The same can be said for the Chile Cheese which have large slices of poblano, tomato and mexican cheese. I also sampled the Red Chicken Mole which were good but not remarkable.

If I had to pick my top 3 tamale joints in LA, Tamales ALberto would be one of them. They close early so plan accordingly.

Masa: Corny, in a good way not greasy. Perfect.

Filling: The best Green Chile Cheese sauce filling ever.

Presentation: Plastic forks and styrofoam plates, meh.

Location: You would never think to stop there. Street and alley parking is OK though, for a quick bag of takeout tamales.

Tamales Alberto
1644 W Temple St, Los Angeles, CA 90026

Hours:
Weekdays 7am-7pm
Weekends 6am-2pm

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Gloria’s Cafe, “The Stepford Wives” of tamales

One of my brilliant ideas for this blog was to record our impressions on an audio recorder as we tasted the tamales. At the time I never thought that I would actually leave the recorder behind at one of the sites. Yup, it happened, and of course we were at an establishment where, um, let’s just say, we weren’t thrilled with the food. Oh well…. I am not sure if the owners of Gloria’s actually listened to anything, (I am hoping that the batteries ran out) but if you ever find a recording on the internet of 2 women trashing “gringo-style” salsa and tamales, that would be us.

Without further ado, here is our assessment of the tamales at Gloria’s Cafe in West Los Angeles.

M & R’s Rants, Raves, & Ratings

Rosemary
I think we just found the “Stepford Wives” of the tamale world. Gloria’s Tamales looked great. While I prefer mine served with husk intact, these unwrapped babes were piping hot and drizzled with a colorful red sauce.

Gloria's Cafe Tamale Plate - Beef and Pork TamalesA quick dissection with a fork showed them to be rich with filling and tender but firm, holding their shape nicely. My mouth watered with expectation. But one bite and I knew that these tamales were meant to be bland.

Perhaps that explained the non-Hispanic crowd that filled the restaurant. Even the salsa was bland. No spice. No heat. All the ingredients were there. It was even hard to tell the flavors apart.

On a more interesting note, however, our server was quite gracious and explained in detail the difference between the Mexican style tamale and the El Salvador style: it’s all in the cooking and packaging. Mexican tamales are wrapped in corn husks and steamed; El Salvador tamales are boiled in banana leaves and tin foil.

Magda
I had never been to Gloria’s before, but the interior looked vaguely familiar. I think I might’ve picked up a take-out order there ages ago, but it’s hard to tell. The “Disneyesque-faux-Mexican” decor is pretty standard in places like this.

The restaurant was packed. This is usually a good sign, however not one single patron was of hispanic origin (or whatever they’re calling us nowadays.) Rosemary and I were called over to a table in the back of the restaurant so we waded through the sea of “gringos” to take our seats.

We were attended to right away with a plate of tortilla chips and salsa as they took our drink orders. Second bad sign… the salsa tasted like tomato soup. Rosemary asked the waiter if they had anything “better” than that. As the waiter gruffly answered “No, that is the best in the house,” Rosemary corrected herself and said, “hotter” not “better.” That calmed him down and he said “Hotter? oh yes we do.” (Note to self, never ask for “better” salsa.)

After we ordered, it took a long time to be served (If I had my recorder I could actually tell you how long it took.) I think they actually steam the tamales to order, which is a good thing. The tamales were hot and fresh. Unfortunately that is about all I can say for them. Both Mexican and Salvadoran tamales consisted of way too much masa and very little filling. The red sauce in both the Chicken and Beef tamales was very similar to the bad salsa that they serve there. There wasn’t even a hint of spice. The Chile/Cheese had a little more flavor brought out by thin slivers of Poblano. Unfortunately the overabundance of masa overwhelmed the filling.

The Salvadoran tamale was perhaps the most disappointing. The masa was very dense and I could’ve sworn it was made of potato or some type of tuber. We asked the waiter and he said that Salvadoran tamales are boiled rather than steamed which results in the dense texture. (Trying to picture this in my head. Boiled tamales???)

The other patrons (a.k.a. gringos) seemed very happy with their meals. Sadly I can’t say the same for mine and cannot recommend Gloria’s for tamales unless you have no clue what a good tamale is supposed to taste like and you like dipping your chips in tomato soup.

Rosemary Rates:

Masa: Good texture, held their shape nicely but bland.

Filling: Fresh and warm but lacked depth and richness

Presentation: Unwrapped but looked delicious with the drizzled red sauce and cheese.

Location: Bad parking, same dumpy strip mall, but conveniently close to Versailles – the Cuban restaurant where you can feel the heat! In case you missed it at Gloria’s.

Magda Rates:

Masa: Good texture, but way too much masa per tamale. The Salvadoran masa was dense and almost chewy.

Filling: Take a magnifying glass with you to find it. Very bland.

Presentation: Dinner plates looked great but I wish the tamales still had their husks on.

Location: The restaurant itself is nice, comfortable and clean, but the busy strip mall location is difficult to navigate and parking is bad. Try and find street parking but note that meters only last an hour on Venice.

Gloria’s cafe is sandwiched between a Metro PCS store and auto parts dealer in a busy, dusty, strip mall on Venice Boulevard on the west side of Los Angeles.

It’s a smallish restaurant serving a large variety of both Salvadoran and Mexican food, including both Mexican and Salvadoran tamales. It is a proper sit-down style restaurant with booths and tables but they also have take-out orders that can be picked up at the back of the restaurant. Tamales may be ordered as part of a “meal” with beans and rice or salad or à la carte.

Mexican Tamales are $4 each. Fillings include Chicken, Beef, Pork, or Chile & Cheese
Salvadoran tamales are $5 each. Fillings available are Pork, Chicken, and Elote.

Gloria’s Cafe
10227 Venice Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90034

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